Hum3D Challenge 2019 | Neon Car | +WIP

Final image

Final image

WIP 1: Sculpting the main shapes

WIP 1: Sculpting the main shapes

WIP 2: Refining the sculpting

WIP 2: Refining the sculpting

WIP 3: SubD Retopology

WIP 3: SubD Retopology

WIP 4: Rear

WIP 4: Rear

WIP 5: Tire modeling

WIP 5: Tire modeling

WIP 6: Headlights modeling

WIP 6: Headlights modeling

WIP 7: Preview in Eevee Viewport

WIP 7: Preview in Eevee Viewport

WIP 8: Presentation rendering

WIP 8: Presentation rendering

WIP 9: Viewport of the entire scene

WIP 9: Viewport of the entire scene

WIP 10: Halftone volume light panels material

WIP 10: Halftone volume light panels material

WIP 11: Car with grease pencil strokes converted to curves

WIP 11: Car with grease pencil strokes converted to curves

abandoned Composition 1

abandoned Composition 1

abandoned Composition 2

abandoned Composition 2

abandoned Composition 3

abandoned Composition 3

abandoned Composition 4

abandoned Composition 4

Scene WIP 1

Scene WIP 1

Scene WIP 2

Scene WIP 2

Scene WIP 3

Scene WIP 3

Hum3D Challenge 2019 | Neon Car | +WIP

I created this artwork for this year's Hum3D Car Rendering challenge (https://hum3d.com/challenges/neon-car/). At first I was only trying to design an entire Mercedes/Audi-inspired car from scratch (being myself an absolute noob when it comes to automotive knowledge!), while modeling it also from scratch and rendering it with realistic materials. But then, while searching for an appropriate rendering style or composition, I got heavily inspired by the 2D look of the Netflix animated series "The Dragon Prince", where the shading is done with generated outlines (possibly inverted normals technique) and fixed strokes as details on the faces. I tried to apply this style to my car and render it within a cyberpunkish Tokyo environment, while also drawing inspiration from the halftone look of Spiderman: Into the Spiderverse. Everything you see in this image is done in 3D (or with textures), except the blue volume light on the left that was added in post. All else that was done in Photoshop was basically just color grading.